For a major television network, Canada's CTV has struggled finding an appropriate international voice solution.

In a discussion with online publications ComputerWorld, CTV telecommunications coordinator Vincent Colmenar explained that during the 2010 Haiti earthquake, several reporters were sent to cover the event. Believing in delivering the news at any cost, CTV paid for a series of international calls, texts and data messages from the reporters on the scene back to the station's Toronto headquarters. It was only after everyone came home when the station learned of the price they had to pay.

"We didn't have a roaming plan, and that trip alone cost us $20,000 to $30,000 in Canadian dollars for voice, text and data costs," Colmenar said.

While Colmenar agreed that it's more important for reporters to be connected as they travel to Haiti or anywhere else in the world, he implemented a series of usage monitoring solutions to help alleviate the shock the station would experience when it came time to pay the bills. Colmenar believes that this is helpful, but doesn't know exactly how much the solutions have saved the station.

While this is a bigger issue in Canada than in the U.S. due to a higher international data rates, it is still something for all organizations to keep in mind. According to the Federal Reserve's Beige Book, business travel expenses rose in 2011, and with so many travel expenses, paying for international voice and data roaming can be easily overlooked.

In industries where information must be delivered, implementing a solution that allows international communication at a set rate would be a wise investment. Subsidium Technologies offers international voice solutions that can connect mobile phones to home offices and keep everyone around the world connected.