The New York Times will soon be offering subscribers an easier way to communicate with them, due to an upgrade of various IT solutions. Improvements in telecommunications technology will allow the Times to provide faster and more efficient service, all in the interest of enhancing the customer experience.

A new interactive voice response (IVR) and text messaging system will give the Times an affordable way to provide customer service without compromising satisfaction. The service will allow subscribers to check their account balance, start and stop their subscription, make payments with a card or electronic check, and report issues regarding their service. Through the use of text messaging, subscribers will be able to receive notifications on their mobile phones as important account changes are made.

The Times anticipates a strong value add from this technology, which has proven to provide a high return on investment for other businesses in the past. The daily newspaper industry has been in a state of flux due to the rise of free digital content, and the New York Times Company suffered a net loss of $39.7 million in 2011.

"The economic environment remained challenging" said Arthur Sulzberger Jr, the New York Times Company's chairman of the board, in a recent conference call regarding 2011 numbers.

With subscription losses hurting revenue, the Times is hopeful that its new customer service system will improve the overall experience of current subscribers, alleviating some of the losses. Businesses rise and fall on the strength approval from their customers, so technology upgrades made in the name of improving customer approval is deemed a wise investment. Subsidium Technologies offers many telecommunications solutions like hosted IVR that can be used to improve interaction with customers and give them a more satisfying experience.